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Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website has released an online edition of all three volumes of The Feynman Lectures on Physics.  This online, read-only feynmanversion is accessible and designed for easy of reading on a variety of devices and includes zoomable figures and equations.  The well-designed website is a great supplement to Kresge’s Feynman collection. Search the library catalog by author to see our complete holdings.

 

Volume I – Mainly Mechanics, Radiation and Heat

Volume II – Mainly Electromagnetism and Matter

Volume III – Quantum Mechanics

 

On August 4, 2014, the DOE released its Public Access Plan to outline the department’s approach and policies to make publications and research data resulting from DOE funding more accessible to the public. This plan is in direct response to the February 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memorandum, Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research and is intended to increase innovation, opportunities, and accelerate scientific breakthroughs by making research more publicly accessible. The Public Access Plan overs the scope, requirements, implementation and timeline, for both publications and scientific digital data.

 

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To help implement the plan, the department has launched PAGES – the Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science – a portal and search engine to ensure long term access and preservation to DOE funded scholarly publications. The agency anticipates that links and metadata for more than 20,000 articles and accepted manuscripts per year will be uploaded, with full-text being available after a 12- month embargo. Questions surrounding reuse and implementation have been raised, but some good conversations have been started around the policy.

The DOE has also announced that starting on October 1, 2014 a data management plan (DMP) will need to be submitted with all funding proposals. The Statement on Digital Data Management details information on creating a DMP, including guidance for researchers to manage their digital data –  including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation – with the focus on sharing and archiving practices.

While there are some mixed reviews of the plan, the DOE is the first federal agency to make their plan public since the OSTP memo. All Federal agencies that spend more than $100 million a year in research will need to release plans, so check back for more information.

berry368
We are happy to announce that the Presentation Practice Studio is up and running and fully furnished. It’s located on the 3rd floor of Berry Library (room 368) right next to the Cook Mathematics Collection. Click here for the floor map (see #7).

The studio allows for easy recording, reviewing, and saving of presentations. An installed camera can be positioned to record a speaker throughout the room, including at the podium and in front of the flat panel display and white board.  You only need to bring a flash drive, or check one out from Jones Media Center, in order to use the equipment.

The Presentation Practice Studio can be booked through the Baker-Berry Study Rooms booking system.

 

RSC_LOGO_CMYK_FINAL RSCChemicalScience.jnlTwo interesting developments from the two most influential scholarly societies for chemical researchers, the American Chemical Society (ACS) and its British counterpart, the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

The RSC announced yesterday that one of its newest publications, Chemical Science (launched in 2010), will move to what’s known as ‘gold’ open access – a fully open journal, free for readers without a subscription.   With the publication of the first issue in 2015, all content published from that issue forward will be freely available.  In addition, for two years, the RSC will waive all Article Processing Charges (APCs), so publishing in Chemical Science will be free for authors too.

Alert viewers will recall that, several months ago, the ACS announced several major open access initiatives (‘ACS Announces Moves to Expand Open Access,’ November 7, 2013) including the launch of a new, fully open ‘gold’ OA journal, to be called ACS Central Science.

OA-centralscienceThough ACS has not opted to waive APC charges, it has created a system of credits for authors publishing in ACS journals that can translate into OA publication in ACS Central Science or any other ACS journal (the corresponding RSC program is called “Gold for Gold” – a voucher system offering vouchers to RSC authors who (and here’s the kicker) are affiliated with institutions subscribing to the premium, aptly-named “Gold,” subscription package (also known as a ‘big deal’ – a bundle of journal subscriptions for a package price that (it turns out) is highly variable among institutions – ‘On the Cost of Journal Bundles,’ June 17, 2014).

Two models, both free of subscription barriers to readers, with somewhat different funding mechanisms and administrative back-ends, and clearly an unspoken (but unmistakeable) scramble to claim the title “first in chemistry open access publishing.”   Not a bad place to be!

BTW Dartmouth authors should recall that COPE funding is available to pay author fees for publication in ANY gold (fully open access) journal.

 

Looking Back ...

Looking Back …

KRESGE LIBRARY…THE FIRST FORTY YEARS

Next time you’re in Kresge, take a look at our latest exhibit chronicling our forty years in Fairchild. Highlights include the many physical changes throughout our history, and even evidence of our own little brush with nature in the form of a flood in our stacks. And at the tender age of forty, we believe we deserve cake, so look for an announcement in the fall and come join us!

Photo exhibit curated by Lisa Ladd, Kresge Physical Sciences Library, and Tracy Snow, Rauner Special Collections Library.

Come by to see our latest exhibit, featuring inspirational and creative artwork by the children of Kresge staff!

Summer 2014 exhibit

If you have artwork or know of someone who would like to exhibit with us, please contact us at Kresge.Library@dartmouth.edu.

poster

Click photo for an enlarged version of the poster

Last week, I presented a poster at the annual Special Libraries Association conference. The theme of the conference was Beyond Borders so the poster was titled “Beyond Information Literacy: Supporting Science & Scholarly Communications.” Click here to get the PDF or email me if you’d like the source file (SVG).

Abstract: ACRL defines information literacy as the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information [1]. While librarians have embraced their roles as educators, many have not gone beyond teaching these skills in courses, workshops, and individual consultations. In the sciences especially, information is easily available through well established digital infrastructures (e.g. repositories) and new publishing models (e.g. open access). Because science students learn how to analyze and use that information through coursework and departmental advising, librarians must find other ways to support them. The librarians at Dartmouth College have begun focusing on helping students develop communication skills and greater awareness of how scientists disseminate their work. This poster will highlight some innovative ways to support scholarly communications and to teach science students how to effectively communicate the knowledge they have acquired. Areas of focus include organizing references, learning and using LaTeX, designing and presenting a research poster, crafting a science elevator pitch, exploring publishing options, and measuring the impact of different work.

[1] Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2000; http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/standards.pdf.

I analyzed the types of private consultations we received at Kresge and the types of outreach programs we hosted or participated in. The data shows that consultations about scientific communication have generally increased, both as a percentage of total consultations and in absolute number. An increased number of outreach programs in the previous semester appear to result in an increased number of consultations and interest in scholarly communication. In other words, there’s value in supporting science and scholarly communications and the library can and should support these needs.

There were a lot of follow-up questions and general interest in the LaTeX-related programs. I had presented specifically on teaching and supporting LaTeX at the Mathematics Roundtable session the day before. People seemed excited to try supporting it at their own institutions.

For further thoughts, read my other blog entry and come by Kresge to see the poster!

Addendum: see some of the other posters from the All-Science Poster Session here.

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