More Than a Century of Sediment Data

USGSSedimentData

USGS Sediment Data Portal

The USGS has just announced a new online, interactive sediment data portal that provides access to more than a century’s worth of data, representing the best available compendium of suspended sediment data for streams and rivers across the nation.

From the announcement:

Ever since sediment samples were first collected in 1889 by pioneering engineer Frederick Newell and 14 of his colleagues on the Rio Grande River at Embudo, N.M., the U.S. Geological Survey has continued to collect and record information on sediment transport in streams and rivers across the Nation.

SedimentDataFilters

Sediment Data Filters

Too much sediment can harm aquatic life and reduce the storage capacity of reservoirs affecting water supply and flood storage. In some instances, too little sediment can also be an issue.  For example, decreased amounts of sediment in the lower Mississippi Basin have been identified as the primary reason for the loss of thousands of square miles of wetlands off the Louisiana coast.

The portal provides easy access to valuable long-term data sets that can be useful in assessing how landscape modifications are affecting sediment transport in streams and rivers. Information on sediment concentrations and grain size can help identify appropriate and cost-effective sediment monitoring methods. Sediment data and ancillary data on streamflow condition, sediment grain size, sampling method, and landscape condition are also available for download within the portal.

(Read more … )

* Special thanks to Emily Wild, US Geological Survey Librarian, for sharing this announcement.

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